Academic programs

Communication and Languages

The department offers five bachelor's degrees, one associate's degree, eight minors and a graduate degree. Contact Academic Advisement if you have questions: (509) 517-2132.

Meet the professors you’ll be learning from.

Do you have strong writing or visual storytelling skills? Do you love to learn about new languages and cultures? Do you want to learn the science and art of getting noticed in a digital world? A communication or language degree may be right for you! 


Bachelor Degrees

Interested in learning more? Contact the film and television advisor Jerry Hartman at (509) 527-2300 or jerry.hartman@wallawalla.edu.

The Bachelor of Science in Film, TV, and Media focuses intensely on teaching visual and audio communication. BS degrees focus more on a specific area of knowledge, and a minor is not required. Graduates often produce, direct, write, edit, and in many ways are involved in the creation of film, documentary, advertising, broadcasting, video, and other visual media. Graduates of this program are well prepared to enter the Master of Arts in Cinema, Religion, and Worldview offered by Walla Walla University or other graduate programs.

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Career Opportunities in Film, Television, and Media

General Areas of Service
Film, TV, and Media graduates look toward employment in commercial, public, and religious radio and television stations, cable television, video/film/multi-image production companies and support industries, recording studios, advertising agencies, media research companies, audio/visual training departments in industry, hospitals, and educational institutions. Media positions are on the increase, with publishing houses accessing the burgeoning home video market. Freelancing opportunities exist for the extremely creative and competent.

Professional Training
A broad liberal arts background combined with strong writing skills is preferred by many employers when hiring non-technical personnel. Courses in media production and philosophy should be combined with courses in writing, business, marketing and the liberal arts. Students are advised to develop at least one practical and marketable media-related skill.

Interested in learning more? Contact the strategic communication advisor Nancy Semotiuk at (509) 527-2060 or nancy.semotiuk@wallawalla.edu.

A Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Strategic Communication integrates a strong core of communication study with skills in journalism, public relations, fundraising, and publishing. Graduates often take positions as writers, editors, fundraisers, public relations practitioners, communication specialists or social media managers, and are prepared for further graduate study.

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Career Opportunities in Strategic Communication

General Areas of Service
Strategic Communication graduates look toward employment in print and broadcast news departments, editorial offices, publishing and printing houses, public relations departments and firms, development offices, and advertising agencies. Possible jobs range from doing technical writing for a computer company to editing publications for an insurance company or college and are found in both the public and private sectors.

Professional Training
The prospective journalist or public relations specialist needs a broad liberal arts education. Wide-ranging interests and curiosity along with the ability to write clearly and concisely under the pressure of a deadline are prerequisites for success. Many journalists continue their education, developing competence in specialized areas such as business, science, education, and consumer affairs.

Denominational Opportunities
While openings on denominational publications staffs are limited, medical, educational, publishing, and broadcasting institutions hire public relations, editorial, development, or marketing personnel and assistants. Church members occasionally freelance for church papers as a sideline to another career. Mass media students who aspire to edit a major church magazine or serve as a conference or union communication secretary would be advised to also complete a major in religion.

Job Outlook
Small broadcast stations, publication, and online newspapers and magazines should provide the best employment opportunities. Competition for journalists will continue to be keen for jobs at large metropolitan and national newspapers, broadcasts stations and networks, and magazines. Improving technology may lead to more employment growth by opening up new areas of work such as online or mobile news divisions.

Employment of public relations specialists is expected to grow 21 percent from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations. The need for good public relations in an increasingly competitive and global business environment should spur the demand for these workers, especially those with specialized knowledge or international experience. Employees who possess additional language capabilities are in great demand.

Interested in learning more? Contact either the international communication professor Jean-Paul Grimaud at (509) 527-2261 or jean-paul.grimaud@wallawalla.edu or the department chair Linda Potter Crumley at (509) 527-2520 or linda.crumley@wallawalla.edu.

Integrates knowledge of communication with a French or Spanish specialization, a minor in an area of the student's choosing, language study abroad, and an international internship to provide a solid foundation of experience in international communication.

A Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Global Communication integrates knowledge of communication with a French or Spanish specialization, a minor in an area of the student's choosing, language study abroad, and an international internship to provide a solid foundation of experience in international communication. Graduates are prepared for careers as communication specialists in international and intercultural organizations such as global business, governments, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), charitable or religious organizations, foundations, media outlets, and international missions.

More information: 

  • Read the Global Communication course requirements to get an idea of what classes you'd take.
  • Don't know which language would be best for you? Find more info on our French and Spanish course requirement pages.
  • Not sure which language course is best for your level? Our placement tests can help!
  • Interested in going overseas? Look at our info on Adventist Colleges Abroad.

Career Opportunities in Global Communication

General Areas of Service
Many Global Communication students go on to work as an international affairs specialist for one of several departments, including the Department of Labor, the Department of Agriculture and even the Department of Energy. Many Global Communication degree holders also find jobs in the Agency for International Development and the Central Intelligence Agency. Working for the government can be great because there are many opportunities to advance in your field as well as the knowledge that you will gain and be able to take with you to future positions.

If working for the government is not for you, think about using your Global Communication degree to find a job in the private sector. Many non-profits seek Program Officers to facilitate international professional exchanges which have been funded by government grants. Others organizations, such as ADRA, are looking for people to send abroad to facilitate humanitarian aid. Many students also work as translators or interpreters and Foreign Service Agents.

The communications field can be a great avenue for Global Communication degree holders. Many political campaigns hire recent graduates who have a Global Communication degree because of the insight that that person can bring to the table. Also, most large communication companies are beginning to go global and they recognize the need to hire people with experience in the global communication realm.

Job Outlook
Employment possibilities for graduates in Global Communication exist in business, government, electronic and print journalism, teaching and private international service (e.g., U.N. Association, Red Cross, etc.). Students completing a degree find it excellent preparation for entry into highly competitive programs of advanced study or work abroad in areas of special interest or knowledge.  Students who participate in international internships, such as those offered through our department, are exceptionally competitive when they graduate.

Interested in learning more? Contact the French studies advisor Jean-Paul Grimaud at (509) 527-2261 or jean-paul.grimaud@wallawalla.edu

If you like connecting with people and learning about how they live - their music, their art, their life experiences; if you are fascinated with travel, expanding your perspective and helping others; and if you are intrigued by how words are translated and how sentences are structured, then language study is for you.

Your French degree can stand alone or act as a perfect complement to almost any other degree.  The study of law, history, education, social work, communication, business, or engineering combined with language studies may lead to career opportunities in international law and diplomacy, corporate marketing or sales, journalism and photojournalism, engineering, or teaching.

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Interested in learning more? Contact the Spanish studies advisor Alma Alfaro at (509) 527-2262 or alma.alfaro@wallawalla.edu.

If you like connecting with people and learning about how they live - their music, their art, their life experiences; if you are fascinated with travel, expanding your perspective and helping others; and if you are intrigued by how words are translated and how sentences are structured, then language study is for you.

If you love working with people, understanding cultural differences, helping others share ideas clearly, then a Spanish major may be a good choice for you. Since Spanish is the second language spoken in America, a Spanish major will better equip you to compete in a tight job market. You will have the confidence to work across cultures and to understand, interpret, and translate messages in professional settings. Students often consider language as a second major, enhancing study in medicine, law, education, engineering, nursing, or social work.

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Associate Degree

To prepare students for admission to Speech Language Pathology and Audiology at Loma Linda University.


Academic Minors

Interested in learning more? Contact the drama advisor David Crawford at (509) 527-2641 or david.crawford@wallawalla.edu.

Learn practical skills for inside and outside of the theatre, while you have a blast with WWU's famous drama minor. A drama minor provides experience in stage acting, directing and other aspects of production. Some graduates from our program go on to grad programs in theatre performance, while others apply their drama skills in religious, educational or community drama. Get great experience in our shows every quarter, in acting, and behind the scenes in directing, producing, writing, costuming, make-up, and set and stage design.

Not sure theatre is the career for you, but still love the stage? A drama minor is a strong addition to any major. The performance skills you'll learn in our program will give you energy, confidence poise and professionalism in all your public presentations and personal interactions. Do yourself a favor. Sign up for a drama minor and find out how performance skills can enhance your career, and make life more fun.

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Career Opportunities in Drama

General Areas of Service
People who become actors, producers, and directors follow many paths to employment. The most important qualities employers look for are creative instincts, innate talent, and the intellectual capacity to perform. The best way to prepare for a career as an actor, especially in the theater, is through formal dramatic training. Producers, and especially directors, need experience in the field, either as actors or in other related jobs.

Education and Training
Formal dramatic training, either through an acting conservatory or a university program, generally is necessary for these jobs, but some people successfully enter the field without it. Most people studying for a bachelor's degree take courses in radio and television broadcasting, communications, film, theater, drama, or dramatic literature. Many stage actors continue their academic training and receive a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) degree. Advanced curricula may include courses in stage speech and movement, directing, playwriting, and design, as well as intensive acting workshops.

Job Outlook
Employment in these occupations is expected to grow 4 percent during the 2010–20 decade, slower than the average for all occupations. Expanding cable and satellite television operations and increasing box-office receipts of major studio and independent films will increase the need for workers. Additionally, a rising demand for U.S. films in other countries should create more employment opportunities for actors, producers, and directors. Also fueling job growth is the continued development of interactive media, online movies, and mobile content produced for cell phones or other portable electronic devices. Attendance at live theater performances should continue to be steady, and drive employment of stage actors, producers and directors.

Interested in learning more? Contact the speech advisor Deborah Silva at (509) 527-2485 or deborah.silva@wallawalla.edu.

An effective combination with majors such as business, pre-law, education and theology. Develop your poise and confidence when speaking to groups, when leading committee discussions, and when working with individuals one-on-one.

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Interested in learning more? Contact the film & television advisor Jerry Hartman at (509) 527-2300 or jerry.hartman@wallawalla.edu.

Works well with areas of study such as business, marketing, graphics, English and history.  Develop great documentaries that inspire audiences and move them to action.  Learn the power of visual communication to tell your story online in your social media community.  You'll develop your skills on the latest HD digital equipment in a working film/television and audio recording studio.

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Interested in learning more? Contact the strategic communication advisor Nancy Semotiuk at (509) 527-2060 or nancy.semotiuk@wallawalla.edu.

Journalism works well as a minor in marketing, psychology, social work or English.  Learn to write effective news stories, share your organization's vision with readers on social media, take better news photos, and write compelling feature articles.

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Interested in learning more? Contact either international communication professor Jean-Paul Grimaud at (509) 527-2261 or jean-paul.grimaud@wallawalla.edu or department chair Linda Potter Crumley at (509) 527-2520 linda.crumley@wallawalla.edu.

Involves courses in multicultural communication as well as a minimum of one quarter spent abroad.

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A language minor makes you more marketable to employers, enhances your cognitive abilities, and broadens your world. As business markets enlarge their global reach, employers are seeking people who can speak a second language fluently. Employees with language abilities earn an average of 2 to 4 percent more than their single-language counterparts. A second language develops your understand of and appreciation for cultural differences and communication styles. Plus, you get to study abroad for a quarter or more.

Minors available through WWU

  • French
  • Spanish
  • German
  • Arabic, Portuguese, and Italian*

*Minors in Spanish, Arabic, Portuguese, and Italian are available only through a one-year ACA study program. Without prior language experience, students taking these minors should plan to spend an entire school year in residence at the ACA school to develop proficiency in the chosen language. All course work for a minor in these languages must be completed while in residence at the ACA school. See the ACA advisor for more information.

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A language minor makes you more marketable to employers, enhances your cognitive abilities, and broadens your world. As business markets enlarge their global reach, employers are seeking people who can speak a second language fluently. Employees with language abilities earn an average of 2 to 4 percent more than their single-language counterparts. A second language develops your understand of and appreciation for cultural differences and communication styles. Plus, you get to study abroad for a quarter or more.

Minors available through WWU

  • French
  • Spanish
  • German
  • Arabic, Portuguese, and Italian*

*Minors in Spanish, Arabic, Portuguese, and Italian are available only through a one-year ACA study program. Without prior language experience, students taking these minors should plan to spend an entire school year in residence at the ACA school to develop proficiency in the chosen language. All course work for a minor in these languages must be completed while in residence at the ACA school. See the ACA adviser for more information.

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M.A. Degree

Learn to create change through film and communicate with different cultural perspectives.

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