ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

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UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES OFFERED


 
Walla Walla College offers courses of study leading to the following undergraduate degrees:      Associate of Science (A.S.)
     Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)
     Bachelor of Music (B.Mus.)
     Bachelor of Science (B.S.)
     Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.)
     Bachelor of Science in Engineering (B.S.E.)
     Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.)

 
Walla Walla College is a comprehensive institution of higher education offering not only traditional liberal arts and professional programs, but also preprofessional and special two-year associate degree curricula for students who may wish to pursue a terminal program of a vocational nature. For a listing of undergraduate areas of study offered see Areas of Study section as listed in this bulletin. For a listing of graduate areas of study offered see the Graduate Bulletin.
 

GRADUATE DEGREES


 
Walla Walla College offers courses of study leading to the following graduate degrees:      Master of Arts (M.A.)
     Master of Education (M.Ed.)
     Master of Science (M.S.)
     Master of Social Work (M.S.W.)

 
Students desiring information concerning graduate degree requirements (standards of admission, degree candidacy, curricula, etc.) should consult the Graduate Bulletin, which is available from the Office of Admissions and Marketing.
 

TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM


 
The Walla Walla College Department of Education and Psychology is authorized by the Washington State Board of Education to recommend both initial and continuing teachers' credentials. Students who plan to enter the teaching profession with a denominational or state teaching credential should become thoroughly acquainted with the certification requirements listed in the Education and Psychology section of this bulletin.
 

BACCALAUREATE DEGREES


 
The Bachelor of Arts degree consists of four years of course work that places the student's major field of study in the context of a liberal arts education. To encourage a wide range of studies, the degree requires a greater concentration of general studies courses than do other degrees and a minor in an area distinct from the major, while it allows a greater number of electives. In the tradition of the liberal arts, all Bachelor of Arts degree majors require foreign language study.
 
The Bachelor of Music degree consists of four years of course work primarily in the major field of study with modified requirements in general studies. The degree is offered with a choice of two majors, Performance or Music Education. For the modified general studies program and other specific requirements, see the Music section of this bulletin.
 
The Bachelor of Science degree consists of four years of course work that places the student's major field of study in the context of a liberal arts education. The degree permits somewhat greater concentration in the field of study and requires fewer general studies courses than does the Bachelor of Arts degree. No foreign language study is required. No minor is required with the exception of Elementary Education.
 
The Bachelor of Business Administration degree consists of a four-year program with concentrations available in accounting, computer information systems, economics, management, and marketing. For specific requirements, see the Business section of this bulletin.
 
The Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree is a four-year program approved by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc., requiring 200 quarter hours of course work. It is designed to prepare students for the profession of engineering and to provide an adequate foundation for graduate studies in civil, electrical, or mechanical areas. For the modified general studies program and other specific requirements, see the Engineering section of this bulletin.
 
The Bachelor of Social Work degree is a four-year program approved by the Council on Social Work Education, the accrediting body for all social work education programs. It prepares students for entry level positions in a variety of social service agencies. For specific requirements, see the Social Work and Sociology section of this bulletin.
 

BACCALAUREATE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS


 
Although general studies are stressed during the first two years of study, students should plan to include certain elementary and intermediate courses in the desired major during the freshman and sophomore years in order to successfully complete the major.
 
A student who is undecided as to a major field of study may, during the freshman year, explore several fields of knowledge without loss of credit if he/she plans his/her choices with an academic adviser. It is best if a major would be chosen no later than the end of the sophomore year. The selection of a minor (for Bachelor of Arts degree candidates) and appropriate electives must be made in consultation with and approved by the assigned academic adviser.
 
Candidates are expected to be fully informed concerning degree requirements and are responsible for their fulfillment. Students shall have the option of meeting degree requirements as published in the bulletin at the time of initial registration or any bulletin published while in regular attendance. Those missing regular attendance for one full school year (except for Christian Service Volunteers) must meet the requirements of the current bulletin upon resuming attendance. Students who have submitted a formal application for a degree (Senior outline) to the Academic Records Office and do not graduate will be allowed only two years after the last date of enrollment to complete all degree requirements under the bulletin specified on the approved Senior outline; otherwise the current bulletin requirements must be met.
 
Degrees are conferred and diplomas issued each quarter. Commencement exercises are held only in June. All coursework must be completed, transcripts received, comprehensives taken and grades received before the degree will be awarded. Dates of degrees for the 1996-97 school year are:
 
AutumnDecember 27, 1996
WinterMarch 28, 1997
SpringJune 15, 1997
SummerAugust 29, 1997
 
Students who complete their work Autumn or Winter quarter may participate in the following June graduation ceremonies. Those anticipating the completion of an approved degree program during the summer may apply to the Academic Records Office requesting participation in the June graduation exercises immediately prior to their last summer in residence.
 
Residency Requirements:
1. 
A minimum of 20% of the requirements in each major and minor must be taken at WWC in residence.
 
2. 
Degree candidates must be in residence the three quarters preceding graduation.
 
3. 
Transfer students must be in residence the three consecutive quarters preceding graduation and must complete a minimum of 36 quarter hours, including 9 upper-division quarter hours in the major and 3 upper-division quarter hours in the minor.
General Requirements:
1. 
Credits required. Successful completion of a minimum of 192 quarter hours (200 quarter hours, Bachelor of Science in Engineering), including 60 quarter hours in courses numbered 300 or above, and a cumulative grade-point average of 2.00 or above in the major, minor, and overall.
 
2. 
Major. The completion of a major field of departmental specialization (minimum of 45 quarter hours and a cummulative grade-point average of 2.00). A grade lower than C- will not apply toward a major except in engineering (see Engineering section of this bulletin). At least 21 quarter hours in the major must be numbered 300 or above. Unless otherwise specified all electives applied to the major must be courses offered by the major department. A course may fulfill requirements for several majors or minors, but credit will apply to only one.
 
3. 
Double Majors. Students taking double majors must meet all the degree requirements for each major, including the general studies programs. Majors must be completed within the degrees under which they are described in this bulletin. (BA majors can serve as second majors only under a BA degree, BS majors can serve as second majors only under a BS degree; the BM, BBA, BSE and BSW degrees cannot have second majors.
 
4. 
Minor. Bachelor of Arts degrees require the completion of a minor of at least 27 quarter hours and a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.00, or completion of an Associate of Science degree, provided it is in an area distinct from the major. Three quarter hours must be courses numbered 300 or above. A grade lower than C- will not apply toward a minor. A course may satisfy content requirements for several majors or minors but credit will apply to only one.
 
5. 
General Studies Requirements. The completion of the general studies requirements as specified for the type of degree sought detailed in the following section (86 quarter hours for the Bachelor of Arts and 74 quarter hours for the Bachelor of Science degree).
 
6. 
Candidacy for degree. Degree candidates must file a formal application (Senior outline) for a degree, showing the proposed schedule of courses for the senior year, with the Registrar not later than one week after the beginning of the first quarter of the senior year. Appropriate forms may be obtained from the Academic Records Office. Students are not considered candidates for degrees or eligible for senior class membership until officially notified by the Registrar that their senior outlines have been approved.
 
7. 
Senior Class. Candidates for degrees must be members of the senior class. The fee is fixed by the class and approved by the President of the College.
 
8. 
Comprehensive Examinations. A comprehensive examination is required for each major before a degree may be conferred. For some majors the Major Field Achievement Test (MFAT) is used, and for others, the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) subject examination is used as the comprehensive. Where GRE subject examinations are not available for specific majors the academic department will provide a comprehensive examination and/or project.
 
 
Students whose majors require that they take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) should make arrangements at the Counseling Center at least six weeks in advance of the test dates.
 
9. 
Transcripts and Correspondence Work. Seniors must have all transfer transcripts on file in the Academic Records Office prior to the end of the final quarter in residence to avoid delay of graduation.
 
10. 
Second Baccalaureate Degree. Two different baccalaureate degrees may be conferred concurrently or sequentially if the candidate has met all requirements, has completed a total of 237 quarter hours, and has spent a minimum of three quarters (36 quarter hours) in residence. See requirement 3 regarding double majors.
 
11. 
Applied Music Credit Applicable Toward Baccalaureate Degree. Not more than 9 quarter hours in applied music (including 3 quarter hours of Ensemble) may be earned toward a baccalaureate degree without an equal number of quarter hours in music courses with prefixes MUCT, MUED or MUHL. Additional hours in applied music may include ensemble hours without restrictions.
 
12. 
Academic Profile Examination. In order to assist the college in its assessment program, all seniors graduating with a Baccalaureate degree are required to take the Academic Profile Examination before graduation.

GENERAL STUDIES REQUIREMENTS


 
Objectives. The general studies courses are designed so that students may increase both their breadth of knowledge and depth of thought in major areas of learning. The breadth of knowledge is achieved by having students take courses from a number of teachers in many departments and disciplines. The depth of thought, which presupposes background, is achieved by taking courses of sufficient duration to allow for in-depth study or by taking courses that presuppose adequate background for intensive study. Courses in the general studies area are taught, as far as possible, so as to show relationships to other fields of knowledge. The format for the general studies courses insures that the students will develop some practical skills, a general knowledge of major areas of learning, in-depth study in selected areas and an overview of the unity of knowledge to help them in their professions as well as to enrich their lives.
 
Following is an outline of the general studies requirements for the various degrees. A full description and listing of general education courses follow the outline.
 
Bachelor of Arts Degree86 quarter hours
(including foreign language)
Bachelor of Music Degree*
Bachelor of Science Degree74 quarter hours
Bachelor of Business Administration Degree74 quarter hours
Bachelor of Science in Engineering Degree*
Bachelor of Social Work Degree74 quarter hours
Associate of Science Degree32 quarter hours
 
*These degrees have modified general studies requirements. Please refer to the respective Departments of Instruction in this bulletin.
 

For the General Studies Honors Program, see the General Studies Honors section of this Bulletin.
 

SPECIFIC COURSES FOR GENERAL STUDIES


 
The range of hours for each area indicates the minimum number of hours that must be chosen from that area and the maximum number of hours from that area that may count toward the total requirement. Some areas are subdivided, with ranges from each subdivision indicating the minimum that must be taken from that subdivsion and the maximum that may count toward that area requirement. Credits earned beyond the listed maximum may be counted as general electives.
 

 
APPLIED ARTS AND SCIENCES2-6

 
Courses in the applied arts and sciences should enhance the student's artistic and technical skills.
 
 Applied Arts: 0-6
  ART161, 162, 163Design3, 3, 3
  ART184, 185, 186Intro to Drawing I, II, III2, 2, 2
  ART194, 195, 196Intro to Painting I, II, III2, 2, 2
  ART201Calligraphy2
  ART244, 245, 246Commercial Art2, 2, 2
  ART264, 265, 266Introduction to Sculpture I, II, III2, 2, 2
  ART284, 285, 286Introduction to Pottery I, II, III2, 2, 2
  ART294, 295, 296Introduction to Printmaking I, II, III2, 2, 2
  COMM231Broadcast Techniques & Announcing4
All 100 and 200 level MUPF courses. This includes participation in performance ensembles and introductory study in instrument or voice. Class instruction is acceptable.
 

 
 Applied Sciences: 0-6
  ACCT201, 202, 203Principles of Accounting4, 3, 3
  ACCT205, 206Principles of Accounting5, 5
  AUTO114Personal Car Care3
  AUTO134, 135Internal Combustion Engine2, 1
  AUTO145, 146Power Train2, 1
  AUTO156, 157Fuel and Electrical Systems2, 1
  AVIA142, 143Private Pilot Flight Training3, 3
  CIS240Intermediate Business Applications4
  CIS280Intermediate Word Processing2
  CPTR141Introduction to Programming (Pascal)4
  CPTR142Data Structures and Algorithms4
  DRFT121, 122Technical Drafting and Design2,2
  DRFT226Architectural Drawing3
  ELCT241Fundamentals of Electronics4
  ENGR121, 122, 123Intro to Engineering2, 2, 2
  FINA101Personal Finance2
  GBUS105Keyboarding1-2
  GBUS106Machine Transcription1
  GBUS108Business Calculators1
  GBUS160Introduction to Business4
  GRPH211, 212, 213Graphic Communication Processes3, 3, 3
  GRPH261Desktop Publishing2
  GRPH264Screen Printing2
  INFO105Personal Computing3
  PHTO156Principles of Photography3
  TECH124Introduction to Technology2
  TECH137Oxyacetylene Welding and Cutting2
  TECH138Shielded Metal Arc Welding2
  TECH139Specialized Welding2
  TECH221, 222, 223Wood Products and Processes2, 2, 2
  TECH241, 242, 243Fabrication and Machining of Metals2, 2, 2

 
HEALTH and PHYSICAL EDUCATION2-6
Courses should introduce the student to health principles and, by stressing both theory and activity, emphasize the pursuit of healthful living. (No more than 4 quarter hours from any one area will count toward the requirement.)
 

 
 Activity Courses: 2-4
 ALL PEAC 107-195 Activity Courses

 
 Theory Courses in Health, Health-related, or Nutrition: 0-4
  HLTH110Wellness for Living3
  HLTH208Drugs and Society3
  HLTH220Human Nutrition4

 
HISTORY and SOCIAL SCIENCE12-20
Courses in history and social science should help the student understand the forces that have shaped the individual in his culture and society.
 
History courses should interpret the sweep of cultures, instilling an appreciation for the development of civilization and an awareness of the unique place of the Christian church in time.
 
Social Science courses should contribute to the student's understanding of the ideas, logic, and methods of the scientific study of human relations.
 

 
 History: 8-12
  HIST120, 121, 122History of Western Civilization4, 4, 4
  HIST221, 222History of the United States4, 4
  HIST242Modern East Asian History4
  HIST274, 275History of England4, 4
  HIST284History of Latin America4
  HIST285History of Mexico4
 Social Science: 4-12*
 (Must include at least one of the following: ANTH 225, PSYC 130, PSYC 444, or SOCI 204)
  ANTH225Cultural Anthropology3
  COMM145Mass Communication Media4
  ECON211Principles of Macroeconomics4
  ECON212Principles of Microeconomics4
  EDUC210Foundations of Education3
  **ENVI385Environmental Stewardship4
  GBUS361Business Law I4
  PLSC224American Government4
  PLSC321Contemporary Issues2
  PSYC130General Psychology4
  PSYC444Social Psychology3
  PSYC455History and Systems of Psychology3
  SOCI204General Sociology4
  SOCI225Marriage and Family Life2
  SOCI236Racial and Ethnic Relations3
  SPCH401Introduction to General Semantics2
*If more than one course is selected from list, courses chosen must be from two or more subject areas.
 

**Only two hours will apply toward the social science requirement; the other two hours will apply to natural science.
 


 
HUMANITIES12-16
Courses in the fine arts, literature, and philosophy should introduce the student to human aesthetic and intellectual aspirations and achievements. Fine arts and literature courses should concentrate upon ideas and styles in their cultural context rather than upon the development of skills. Philosophy courses should in their manner and subject matter clearly make for an understanding of and appreciation for philosophy as a distinct mode of inquiry.
 
 Fine Arts: 0-8
  ART251Introduction to Art4
  ART324, 325, 326History of World Art3, 3, 3
  MUHL124Introduction to Music4
  MUHL134The Art of Listening3
  *MUHL311, 312Survey of Music History4, 4
  SPCH363History of Dramatic Arts4
*Registration requires permission of instructor.
 

 Literature: 0-8
  ENGL204Introduction to Literature4
  ENGL209Religious Literature4
  *ENGL210, 211, 212Survey of English and American Literature4, 4, 4
  ENGL214Themes in Literature4
  ENGL215Introduction to Film Literature4
  ENGL314Advanced Themes in Literature4
  ENGL315Advanced Film Literature4
  ENGL316Literature of the American West4
  ENGL317Pacific Northwest Writers4
  ENGL358Classical Literature4
  ENGL359World Literature4
  ENGL454Literature of the Bible4
  ENGL456American Literature & Painting4
  FREN40617th Century French Literature4
  FREN40718th Century French Literature4
  FREN40819th Century French Literature4
  FREN40920th Century French Literature4
  GRMN311, 312, 313Survey of German Literature3, 3, 3
  GRMN42118th Century German Literature4
  GRMN42219th Century German Literature4
  GRMN42320th Century German Literature4
  SPAN324, 325, 326Survey of Spanish Literature3, 3, 3
  SPAN424, 425Contemporary Spanish Literature3, 3
  SPAN431, 432, 433Survey of Latin-American Literature3, 3, 3
*Registration requires permission of instructor.
 


 
 Philosophy: 0-8
  PHIL204Essentials of Critical Reasoning4
  PHIL205Introduction to Philosophy4
  PHIL206Introduction to Logic4
  PHIL305Moral Philosophy4
  PHIL306, 307History of Philosophy4, 4
  PHIL407Philosophy of Science4
  PHIL412Philosophy of Religion4
  SPCH341Argumentation4

 
LANGUAGE ARTS13-21
Courses should introduce the student to the concepts and skills of the language arts by emphasizing the practice of effective written and oral communication. Courses in foreign language should emphasize the acquisition of such communicative skills as speaking, reading, and writing a foreign language while introducing students to a foreign culture and its thought.
 

 
 College Writing: 9
  ENGL121, 122College Writing3, 3
  ENGL223Research Writing3
  ENGL323Writing for Engineers3
 Speech and Writing: 0-12*
  ENGL324Essay Writing3
  ENGL325Writing for the Professions3
  ENGL334Poetry Writing3
  ENGL335Narrative Writing3
  ENGL336Drama Writing3
  JOUR245Newswriting4
  JOUR341Magazine Article Writing4
  SPCH101Fundamentals of Speech Communication4
  SPCH207Small Group Communication3
  SPCH443Persuasive Speaking4
*The first course in speech and writing area must be selected from oral speech courses.
 

 Foreign Language: 0-12**
  FREN101Introduction to French4
  FREN102, 103Elementary French4, 4
  FREN202, 203Intermediate French4, 4
  GREK121, 122, 123Greek I3, 3, 3
  GREK221, 222, 223Greek II3, 3, 3
  GRMN111Introduction to German4
  GRMN112, 113Elementary German4, 4
  GRMN212, 213Intermediate German4, 4
  JAPN131Introduction to Japanese4
  JAPN132, 133Elementary Japanese4, 4
  LATN211, 212, 213Latin I4, 4, 4
  LATN311, 312, 313Latin II4, 4, 4
  SPAN121Introduction to Spanish4
  SPAN122, 123Elementary Spanish4, 4
  SPAN222, 223Intermediate Spanish4, 4
**B.A. degree requires twelve hours of same language or two years of same language in secondary school.
 


 
MATHEMATICS and NATURAL SCIENCE12-16
Courses in mathematics should emphasize mathematical thought and practice and the relationship of mathematics to other disciplines. Courses in science should emphasize methods of measurement and discovery and should help the student to understand through theory and practice how hypotheses are developed, tested, and applied. (A minimum of 8 quarter hours must be taken from one course sequence in a laboratory science area.)
 

 
 Mathematics: 4-8
  MATH105Mathematics with Applications4
  MATH112, 113Mathematics for Elementary Teachers3, 3
  MATH117Precalculus5
  MATH121, 122Fundamentals of Mathematics I, II4, 4
  MATH123Survey of Calculus4
  MATH181, 281Analytic Geometry and Calculus I, II4, 4
  MATH206Applied Statistics4
  MATH282, 283Analytic Geometry and Calculus III, IV4, 4
 Natural Science: 8-12i
  ASTR141, 142General Astronomy4, 4
  BIOL101, 102, 103General Biology4, 4, 4
  BIOL105, 106Biology for General Studies4, 4
  BIOL201, 202Anatomy and Physiology4, 4
  CHEM101, 102Introductory Chemistry4, 4
  CHEM141, 142, 143General Chemistry3, 3, 3
  CHEM144, 145, 146General Chemistry Laboratory1, 1, 1
  **ENVI385Environmental Stewardship4
  PHYS201, 202Invitation to Physics3, 3
  PHYS204, 205Invitation to Physics Laboratory1, 1
  PHYS211, 212, 213General Physics3, 3, 3
  PHYS214, 215, 216General Physics Laboratory1, 1, 1
  PHYS251, 252, 253Principles of Physics3, 3, 3
  PHYS254, 255, 256Principles of Physics Laboratory1, 1, 1
*Eight hours must be taken from one course sequence.
 

**Only two hours will apply toward the natural science requirement; the other two hours will apply to social science.
 


 
RELIGION and THEOLOGY16-20
Courses in religion and theology should emphasize an understanding and application of Biblical knowledge, foster continued spiritual growth, and help the student develop a personal religious philosophy and prepare for active witnessing.
 
A minimum of 6 quarter hours must be from courses numbered 300 and above.
 
Religion requirements for transfer students from non-SDA colleges:
Students transferring from regionally-accredited non-Seventh-day Adventist schools who need an equivalent of 3 quarters of course work, 48 hours inclusive of religion, for completion of their degrees at Walla Walla College are required to take 9 hours of course work in religion, of which three hours must be in RELB courses and of which three hours must be upper division. For these students a maximum of three hours may be transferred upon initial admission.
 
Students at Walla Walla College who need 4-6 quarters of course work, 64-96 hours inclusive of religion, for the completion of their degree are required to take 12 quarters of religion credit, of which six hours must be RELB courses and of which six hours must be upper division. For these students, a maximum of six hours may be transferred upon initial admission. Students transferring from regionally-accredited Seventh-day Adventist schools must meet all religion requirements of Walla Walla College and may transfer any amount of religion credits according to current policy.
 

 
 Biblical Studies: 6-20
  RELB104The Ministry of Jesus4
  RELB105The Sermon on the Mount2
  RELB106The Parables of Jesus2
  RELB111Messages of the Old Testament4
  RELB216Messages of Paul4
  RELB301Old Testament History3
  RELB302Pentateuch3
  RELB303Writings3
  RELB304Interpreting the Prophets4
  RELB305Hebrew Prophets and Contemporary Issues 4
  RELB312Daniel3
  RELB313Revelation3
  RELB434, 435, 436Gospels3(4), 3(4), 3(4)
  RELB464, 465, 466New Testament Epistles3, 3, 3

 
 Electives in Religion or Theology: 0-14
  RELH205Biblical Archaeology3
  RELH402Modern Denominations3
  RELH403World Religions3
  RELH406History of the English Bible2
  RELH457History of Adventism2
  RELM233Introduction to Cross-Cultural Ministry3
  RELT110Seventh-day Adventist Belief and Practice4
  RELT201The Christian Way of Salvation4
  RELT202Fundamentals of Christian Belief4
  RELT246Christian Ethics I2
  RELT247Christian Ethics II2
  RELT314Christian Hope3
  RELT317Inspiration and Revelation4
  RELT330Christian Discipleship3
  RELT340Theology of Spiritual Care4
  RELT404Approaches to Biblical Interpretation2
  RELT412Philosophy of Religion4
  RELT418Aesthetics and Spirituality3
  SOCI449Sociology of Religion2

GENERAL STUDIES HONORS PROGRAM

The General Studies Honors Program offers a group of interdisciplinary courses stressing independent research, writing, and discussion.
 
This program is a separate track of general studies and not a major or a minor in itself. Honors courses have a flavor distinctly different from the regular general studies courses because they use primary source material more extensively than textbooks to enhance the development of independent thinking, they follow an interdisciplinary approach to stress the unity of knowledge, and the classes are more personalized and typically are small. Western Thought I, team taught by history and English faculty, will provide general studies history and literature credits. Western Thought II, team taught by science and humanities faculty, will provide general studies laboratory science and humanities credits.
 
Students finishing the program with a 3.25 cumulative honors G.P.A. receive a six hour tuition grant and, at graduation, are designated as "General Studies Honors Graduates."
 
Admission Requirements. The Admissions Committee considers high school grade-point average (generally 3.30 or higher), ACT test scores or equivalent, an essay submitted by the student as part of his application, and on occasion, personal interviews with applicants and recommendations from teachers. Students already enrolled in college may also apply to the program. The Honors Committee will review all applications and supporting data and notify those students who are accepted.
 
Students not currently in the Honors Program may petition the General Studies Honors Committee to enter a specific honors class. Petitions must be submitted to the Honors Committee chair prior to the close of registration. Class size permitting, students may be admitted on the basis of grade-point average, ACT scores, and writing skills.
 
Program Requirements. The following requirements must be met to complete the honors program: a cumulative grade-point average of 3.25 or better in honors courses, and completion of at least 35 quarter hours of honors courses (listed below) including two quarters of Western Thought I; HONR 131, plus either HONR 132 or 133; any two quarters of Western Thought II; HONR 311, 312, 313; HONR 496, 497, 498. Students who complete three quarters of Latin (LATN 211, 212, 213) will receive four hours credit toward fulfillment of honors requirements.
 

HONORS COURSES


 
HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE

 

HONR 131, 132, 133  WESTERN THOUGHT I 4, 4, 4
Integration of Western history and literature with added emphasis on philosophical concepts and their relationships to events. Completion of all three quarters satisfies 8 hours of general studies history and 4 hours of literature; completion of 8 hours satisfies 4 hours of history and 4 hours of literature; completion of 4 hours satisfies 4 hours of general studies humanities. HONR 131 is a prerequisite to HONR 132 or HONR 133.)
 



HONR 349  RELIGION IN A SOCIAL CONTEXT 4
Study of religion in its social setting, including the nature and role of religious symbol systems, the importance of religion in the creation of social values, the function of religion in social change, and the institutionalization of religion. Satisfies 4 hours of general studies social science or 4 hours religion.
 


HUMANITIES

 

HONR 311, 312, 313  WESTERN THOUGHT II 4, 4, 4
Study of historical science and its relationship to the humanities in the Western world from the classical period to the present; includes study of mathematics, science, visual arts, and music in both classroom and laboratory settings. Completion of all three quarters satisfies 8 hours laboratory science and 4 hours humanities (fine arts) or 8 hours humanities (4 fine arts, 4 philosophy) and 4 hours science. Students who take two quarters receive credit for four hours of science and four hours of humanities. Students who take one quarter receive credit for four hours of humanities. Prerequisites: HONR 131 and either HONR 132 or 133; MATH 123 or 181.
 


LANGUAGE ARTS

HONR 141, 142  COLLEGE WRITING 3, 3
Advanced college writing designed to integrate writing with readings of significant classic and contemporary texts which complement the general studies honors curriculum. Satisfies College Writing 121, 122 requirement.
 


RELIGION

HONR 281, 282, 283  THE NEW TESTAMENT AND ITS ENVIRONMENT 2, 2, 2
Study of certain New Testament themes in the light of first-century Jewish and Hellenistic culture and thought. HONR 281 is a prerequisite for either HONR 282 or 283. Each course satisfies two hours of RELB general studies religion credit.
 



HONR 349  RELIGION IN A SOCIAL CONTEXT 4
Study of religion in its social setting, including the nature and role of religious symbol systems, the importance of religion in the creation of social values, the function of religion in social change, and the institutionalization of religion. Satisfies 4 hours of general studies social science or 4 hours religion.
 


SEMINAR

HONR 496, 497, 498  HONORS SEMINAR 1, 1, 1
Seminar that seeks to integrate learning and religious faith. Students present formal papers based on reading, research, and dialogue with faculty. Must be taken in sequence. Applies towards overall general studies requirements, but not to the minimum in any specific area. Prerequisite: Completion of 32 hours of HONR classes or senior standing.
 


ASSOCIATE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

The two-year associate degree programs are intended to provide accredited technological and occupational preparation for students desiring to graduate with marketable skills while experiencing the full benefits of a residential Christian college.
 
Candidates are expected to be fully informed concerning degree requirements and are responsible for their fulfillment. Students shall have the option of meeting degree requirements as published in the bulletin at the time of initial registration or any bulletin published while in regular attendance. Those missing regular attendance for one full school year (except for Student Missionaries and Task Force workers) must meet the requirements of the current bulletin upon resuming attendance.
 
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ASSOCIATE DEGREE
All candidates for the associate degree must complete the following residence and general requirements:
 
Residency Requirements:
A minimum of 24 quarter hours. The last two quarters must be completed in residence, including a minimum of 9 quarter hours earned in the concentration.
 
General Requirements:
1. 
A minimum of 96 quarter hours must be completed.
 
2. 
A cumulative grade-point average of 2.00 (C) is required. A grade lower than C- will not apply toward the concentration.
 
3. 
The associate degree concentration as outlined under the respective departments of instruction of this bulletin must be completed.
 
4. 
The general studies requirements as outlined below must be completed. For a listing of the courses which may apply to the requirements, see Specific Courses for General Studies section of this Bulletin.
 
5. 
A course may fulfill requirements for one or more concentrations but credit will apply to only one concentration.
 
6. 
Students must have all transcripts for correspondence and transfer credit on file in the Academic Records Office two weeks prior to graduation. A maximum of 12 quarter hours of correspondence credit will be accepted. All correspondence work must be completed prior to the beginning of the last quarter in residence.
 
7. 
Degree candidates must file a formal application (Senior Outline) for a degree showing the proposed schedule of courses for the senior year with the Registrar not later than one week after the beginning of the first quarter of the senior year. Appropriate forms may be obtained from the Academic Records Office. Students are not considered candidates for degrees and are not eligible for senior class membership until officially notified by the Registrar that their senior outlines have been approved.
General Studies Requirements for the Associate Degree:

 
HoursHours
AreasMinimum/MaximumMinimum/Maximum
in specific subject areasin general areas
Applied Arts and Sciences0-2
Health and Physical Education0-2
History and Social Science0-8
   History0-8
   Social Science0-8
Humanities0-8
   Fine Arts0-4
   Literature0-4
   Philosophy0-4
Language Arts9-13
   ENGL 121, 122, 2239
   Speech and Writing0-4
   Foreign Language0-4
Mathematics and Natural Science0-8
   Mathematics0-8
   Natural Science0-8
Religion and Theology6-8
   Biblical Studies4-8
   Electives in Religion or Theology0-4
Select a minimum of 32 quarter hours for the Associate degree.
 

PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS

Programs are offered in a wide variety of fields to prepare students for admission to professional schools or to enter upon technical careers. Students wishing to secure admission to such schools should familiarize themselves with the admission requirements of the school of their choice. Most preprofessional curriculums require two units of high school mathematics (algebra and geometry). The following preprofessional curricula are detailed in the Preprofessional Programs section of this bulletin:
Architecture (2)*
Chiropractic (2)
Cytotechnology (2)
Dentistry (3)
Dental Hygiene (2)
Emergency Medical Care/
Cardiopulmonary Sciences (2)
Health Information Administration (2)
Law (4)
Medicine (4)
Medical Technology (4)
Nutrition and Dietetics (2)

 
*Numbers in parenthesis indicate the years of study normally required on the Walla Walla College campus before acceptance into a professional school.
 

TRANSITIONAL COURSES

The transitional courses are designed for freshman students who have been accepted by the College with an inadequate background for attempting a full academic program. It consists of ENGL 100, GNRL 100, MDEV 003, NRSG 100, and RDNG 100. Students are registered for these courses on the basis of test scores from their entrance examinations and/or secondary school grades. Credit received from the courses in this curriculum do not apply to the 192 quarter hours for graduation. However, they do count towards the minimum study load for a term (see Study Load section of this Bulletin).
 
The Director of Academic Advisement closely advises and schedules regular academic counseling sessions for all students in this program. This counseling procedure continues throughout the freshman year, although most transitional students are able to carry a full college load by the beginning of the winter quarter.
 

COURSE NUMBERING

The course numbering sequence is designed to reflect in varying degrees a progression in course content, level of approach, and breadth of coverage. The course description further delineates specific course content progression. This information provided by the course number, prefix, and description should serve as a general guide to students in selecting courses compatible with their background and ability.
 
In general, the following guidelines have been used in course numbering: The first numeral indicates academic level of the course:
 
001-100Remedial and Experiential courses (credits do not apply toward graduation, but do apply to financial aid minimums.)
101-199Courses normally taken during the freshman year
200-299Courses normally taken during the sophomore year
300-399Courses normally taken during the junior year
400-499Courses normally taken during the senior year
 
The third numeral will indicate course sequencing. Courses in which the third numerals are 1, 2, and 3, must be taken in sequence.
 
The credit indicated in connection with a course is the "quarter hour," and one quarter hour represents one recitation period per week for one quarter or three clock hours of laboratory work.
 
The College will make every effort consistently to offer all courses at appropriate intervals. It does reserve the right, however, to alter the sequences or drop courses if unforeseen circumstances in class enrollments or teacher staffing so dictate. The Class Schedule should be consulted for personal planning of course loads and schedules.
 
The College reserves the right to withdraw temporarily any course which does not have an adequate enrollment. A course may not be offered for fewer than six students except for seniors or graduate students.
 
When courses specify that they are offered odd or even years, "odd or even" refers to the year in which the academic Bulletin takes effect.
 
UNIFORM COURSE NUMBERS
By general agreement certain course numbers are reserved for classes that are of such a general nature as to be found in many departments. The prefix assigned to the number designates the discipline. The following are courses that carry uniform numbers throughout this bulletin:
 

001-100   REMEDIAL COURSES 1-4
Courses for students needing to improve basic skills in preparation for college level work. Credit will not apply toward graduation, but will apply to financial aid minimums and for deferment of educational loans. Remedial courses taken and grades received will appear on the quarterly grade report and WWC transcript. However, since these courses are not college level, they will not calculate into the college GPA, academic probation status, or class level requirements.
 



100   EXPERIENTIAL PROGRAM 6; 18
Program with qualified supervision and structured experience including Christian Service Volunteer, Task Force and Cooperative Education. Credit will not apply toward graduation or class level requirements, but will apply for deferment of educational loans. Graded S or NC.
 



200; 400  TOPICS 1-5; 10
Courses in specialized or experimental areas on either the lower division or advanced level. These courses are conducted through regular class activities and are approved by the Curriculum Committee as a one-time offering. See the Class Schedule for all approved Topics courses.
 



259; 459  SUPPLEMENTAL STUDIES 1-2; 2
Previous course work supplemented when portions of a course required in the student's program have been omitted. Ordinarily supplementation will occur only with transfer students or within a program that has undergone a major curriculum change. A study proposal is to be outlined in consultation with the instructor of the course being supplemented and approved by the department and the Academic Standards Committee. May not be substituted for existing courses.
 



274; 474  WORKSHOPS 1-4; 6



280; 370; 490  DIRECTED FIELD WORK/PRACTICUM/EXPERIENCE 2-16



392   GENERAL SECONDARY METHODS COURSE (SEE EDUCATION) 2



395; 396  DEPARTMENTAL METHODS COURSES 3



469   ADVANCED STUDY 1-3; 3
Advanced directed study by which students may enhance the major or minor in breadth or depth in topics not covered by the department curriculum. The study proposal must be approved by the department faculty and the Academic Standards Committee and should indicate the methods of evaluation. May not be substituted for existing courses in the major or minor.
 



479   DIRECTED RESEARCH/PROJECT 1-3; 6
Individual research, and/or laboratory work, or technical project in the major. (Some departments may allow this course on the minor.) A project proposal is required to define the scope of the work and the method of reporting. Requires permission of the department faculty with a copy of the proposal sent to the Office of the Associate Vice President for Academic Administration. See individual departments for specific course description.
 



494   COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 0-12
Practical experience in the major in an off-campus setting. Permission of the director of Cooperative Education and departmental approval required. See individual departments for specific course description.
 



495   COLLOQUIUM 0



496; 497; 498  SEMINAR 1-4




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