BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Scott Ligman, Chair; David Cowles, Joe Galusha, David Lindsey, Jim Nestler, Joan Redd, Director of Graduate Program

In addition to fulfilling the mission of Walla Walla College, the objectives of the Department of Biological Sciences are:

1.   To prepare students for careers in research and teaching positions in             institutions of higher education by giving them a firm foundation for work   toward a doctoral degree.

2.   To provide an educational background for careers in industry.

3.   To increase the competence of secondary school teachers.

The Department of Biological Sciences offers a Masters of Science degree in biology for students who wish to prepare for careers in research and teaching or continue their education through a Ph.D., subsequently entering careers in research or college and university teaching.

The program of course work and research developed for each graduate student takes into account the academic background, present interests, and future goals of the student.

ADMISSION

Applicants must meet the general admission requirements as outlined earlier in the Graduate Bulletin. Satisfactory scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), both subject and general, are required. Applicants must also submit a statement of objectives and goals.

REQUIREMENTS

Students must complete all requirements as listed in this bulletin and in the "General Procedures for the Completion of the M.S. Degree in Biology" (available from the department). A Program of Study prepared on an official form must be approved by the program director and submitted to Graduate Council by January 15 of the final year of graduate studies (or two quarters prior to completion of the program).  Official approval of this program will be acknowledged by a letter from the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Any changes in the study program must be documented on a Program Change Form and  require the signatures of the adviser, program director and the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Because of the variety of biological and interdisciplinary opportunities available at the Walla Walla College Marine Station, all graduate students are  encouraged to attend one summer term.

Prerequisite background:

Undergraduate background should include a B.S. or B.A. in Biology from an accredited institution.  Students with degrees in other science areas should contact the department before applying.  Specific cognate courses required include: General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, General Physics, and Precalculus.


Curriculum requirements:

The primary requirement is the completion of a thesis based upon original research. Program requirements consist of a minimum of 45 quarter credits, 27 of which must be courses numbered 500 or above. Not more than five credits below a B- grade will be accepted on the graduate program.

Courses (45 credits)

Graduate Seminar (BIOL 510)5

Thesis Proposal (BIOL 544)2

Thesis Research (BIOL 545)8

Thesis (BIOL 546)2

Additional 500-level BIOL courses10

Colloquium (BIOL 495) six quarters0

Additional electives18

GRADUATE COURSES - BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

BIOL 501 RESEARCH IN BIOLOGY                                                      2-4; 8

Individual work in a topic of original research carried out under the direction of one of the instructors. Two to four hours per quarter; maximum, eight.

BIOL 510 GRADUATE SEMINAR                                                                       1; 6

Involves presentation of topics and discussion of current research in specific areas of biology. Spring quarter normally involves a research plan and progress report for first-year students. One credit each quarter. Maximum of six credits.

BIOL 530 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY TECHNIQUES                                           4 or 5

Introduction to the theory and practice of modern molecular techniques.  The laboratory will include techniques such as the purification and analysis of DNA, RNA, and protein, recombination DNA procedures, mutagenesis, hybridization methods, PCR, and DNA sequencing technology.  Two laboratories per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 393, CHEM 323, 326. (College Place campus - 4 quarter hours; Marine Station - 5 quarter hours.)

BIOL 540 READINGS IN BIOLOGY                                                                  2; 10

Analysis of classical and current literature in specific areas of biology. Areas of concentration may include disciplines such as biostatistics, development, ecology, ethology, genetics, natural history, philosophy of biology, or physiology. Requires reports and conferences with a staff member. A maximum of four credits in any one area.

BIOL 544 THESIS PROPOSAL                                                                             2

Preparation and approval of the master's thesis proposal.  A research topic is selected and a formal research proposal is written in consultation with the student's major professor and graduate committee.  A final grade is given after proposal revisions have been completed and proposal cover sheet is signed by the student's committee members.

BIOL 545 THESIS RESEARCH                                                                       1-8; 8

Collection and analysis of data for master's thesis.  A grade of IP is given until completion of all four credits, at which time the same grade is given for all four credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 544 or permission of the instructor.


BIOL 546 THESIS                                                                                                2

Writing, presentation, defense, and revision of the master's thesis based upon original biological research.  A final grade is given after revisions have been completed, thesis cover sheet signed by committee members, and final thesis copies submitted to the department.  Prerequisite: BIOL 545 or permission of the instructor.

SUPPORTING COURSES - BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

BIOL 101, 102, 103 or equivalent is prerequisite for all courses listed below.

BIOL 403 ORNITHOLOGY                                                                             4 or 5

Study of native birds of North America, with emphasis on physiology, identification, migration, and life histories. One weekend field trip required. (College Place campus, 4 quarter hours; Marine Station, 5 quarter hours.) Offered every 3-5 years at the Marine Station; offered even years only on the College Place campus. (Course fee applies)

BIOL 405 NATURAL HISTORY OF VERTEBRATES                                                4

Study of vertebrates with emphasis on natural history, ecology, physiology, and taxonomy.  One laboratory per week. A weekend field trip is required. Offered odd years only. (Course fee $40)

BIOL 420 SOCIOBIOLOGY                                                                                   3

A study of current concepts and ideas relating to the origin and structure of social behavior in animals.  Special attention is focused on the adaptive significance of species-specific behavior in a wide variety of environments.

BIOL 426 SYSTEMATIC BOTANY                                                                  4 or 5

Study of the principles of plant classification, together with a systematic survey of vascular plants, with emphasis on natural history and ecology. (College Place campus, 4 quarter hours; Marine Station, 5 quarter hours.) Offered on demand.

BIOL 430 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY TECHNIQUES                                           4 or 5

Introduction to the theory and practice of modern molecular techniques.  The laboratory will include techniques such as the purification and analysis of DNA, RNA, and protein, recombination DNA procedures, mutagenesis, hybridization methods, PCR, and DNA sequencing technology. Two laboratories per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 393, CHEM 323, 326. (College Place campus - 4 quarter hours; Marine Station - 5 quarter hours.)  Offered even years only.

BIOL 435 DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY                                                                4

Principles of development of plants and animals. Emphasizes problems of growth, differentiation, and morphogenesis.  Laboratory work consists of both descriptive and experimental analysis of development.  One laboratory per week.  Pretequisites: BIOL 392,393 and CHEM 322; or permission of department.

BIOL 449 VERTEBRATE HISTOLOGY                                                                   4

Study of the microscopic anatomy of vertebrate cells, tissues, and organs, including reference to their functions. Two laboratories per week.

BIOL 464 ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY                                                                         4

Study of animal physiology with emphasis on integration of vertebrate organ systems. One laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 392. PHYS 213, 216 strongly recommended.

BIOL 466 IMMUNOLOGY                                                                                      4

Study of the molecular and cellular bases of the immune response including clinical applications.  One laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 392, 393.


BIOL 483 PHILOSOPHY OF ORIGINS AND SPECIATION                                      3

Comparison of the various theories on the origin and history of living organisms in light of present scientific knowledge in biochemistry, paleontology, morphology, geology, genetics and other related areas.

BIOL 495 COLLOQUIUM                                                                                      0

Lecture series designed to expose students to modern scientific research and researchers. Each lecture is normally given by a visiting scientist. Graded S or NC.

MARINE STATION

BIOL 101, 102, 103 or equivalent is prerequisite for all courses listed below. Marine Station courses of 5 credits include an additional credit for the requirement of a research project. Normally a maximum of two of the following courses are taught during a summer. Please see annual Marine Station bulletin.

BIOL 458 MARINE BIOLOGY                                                                                5

An integrated approach to understanding the marine environment primarily from an ecological perspective. Included are principles of basic oceanography, plankton biology, deep-sea biology, and shallow-water marine communities. Research project and field trips required.

BIOL 460 MARINE ECOLOGY                                                                               5

Study of interspecific, intraspecific, and community relationships demonstrated by marine organisms.

BIOL 462 ICHTHYOLOGY                                                                                     5

Systematic study of the fishes found in Puget Sound, with a survey of the fishes of other waters.

BIOL 463 MARINE PHYCOLOGY                                                                          5

A systematic survey of marine algae, covering the principles of their classification, natural history, ecology, physiology, and practical use.

BIOL 468 COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY                                                              5

Comparative study of the physiology and life processes of animals with emphasis on invertebrates. Prerequisite: BIOL 392.

BIOL 475 MARINE INVERTEBRATES                                                                    5

A study of the biology of selected groups of marine invertebrates.