Career Opportunities in Journalism/PR

General Areas of Service
Mass communication graduates with a journalism or public relations concentration look toward employment in print and broadcast news departments, editorial offices, publishing and printing houses, public relations departments and firms, development offices, and advertising agencies. Possible jobs range from doing technical writing for a computer company to editing publications for an insurance company or college and are found in both the public and private sectors.

Professional Training
The prospective journalist or public relations specialist needs a broad liberal arts education. Wide-ranging interests and curiosity along with the ability to write clearly and concisely under the pressure of a deadline are prerequisites for success. Many journalists continue their education, developing competence in specialized areas such as business, science, education, and consumer affairs.

Denominational Opportunities
While openings on denominational publications staffs are limited, medical, educational, publishing, and broadcasting institutions hire public relations, editorial, development, or marketing personnel and assistants. Church members occasionally freelance for church papers as a sideline to another career. Mass media students who aspire to edit a major church magazine or serve as a conference or union communication secretary would be advised to also complete a major in religion.

Job Outlook
*Small broadcast stations, publication, and online newspapers and magazines should provide the best employment opportunities. Competition for journalists will continue to be keen for jobs at large metropolitan and national newspapers, broadcasts stations and networks, and magazines. Improving technology may lead to more employment growth by opening up new areas of work such as online or mobile news divisions.

*Employment of public relations specialists is expected to grow 21 percent from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations. The need for good public relations in an increasingly competitive and global business environment should spur the demand for these workers, especially those with specialized knowledge or international experience. Employees who possess additional language capabilities are in great demand. 

Earnings – updated May 2012 (Bureau of Labor Statistics)

* TV News Reporter: $36,000
* TV News Producer: $68,440
* Newspaper Reporter: $36,000
* PR Specialists: $57,550
* TV News Anchor: $65,414
* Newspaper City Editor: $51,470
* Magazine Senior Editor: $55,420
* Magazine Editor-in-chief: $68,977


Sources of Additional Information

* United States Department of Labor – Bureau of Labor Statistics 

Academic Advisor: Nancy Semotiuk

Page maintained by Serena Dewey
Last update on August 8, 2013